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Water Babies: Pregnancy, Babies And Hydration

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With excitement building about the impending Royal birth, now is a timely moment to remind pregnant women and new mothers about the importance of hydration for mother and baby.

As the Duchess of Cambridge no doubt already knows from experience, pregnant and nursing mothers need more water than the usual 8 glasses a day (1.8 litres). Check your hydration levels by looking at the appearance of your tongue – it should be moist and clear; and checking the colour of your urine – which should be pale straw coloured. Don’t worry if you are dehydrated: just drink water and the symptoms should be swiftly alleviated.

Once your baby arrives, breast-feeding should ideally continue for at least four months, and ideally throughout the first year but British bottled water is generally perfect for parents who decide, or whose circumstances dictate the need, to use formula-feed, or who use bottles as a supplement to breast-feeding.

 

A handy guide for parents about fluid for babies and young children is published on this website... http://www.britishbottledwater.org/children-and-babies.asp

 

FLUID REQUIREMENTS

The water needs of children are far greater than most people realise. Their needs vary depending on age and body weight. Remember, young children need milk as well as water.

 

The age of the baby or child dictates the amount of fluid necessary for good health so check our handy chart to see what your toddler might need. Always consult your health professional or doctor for definitive information if you have any concerns about baby and child healthcare matters.

 

BOYS

Age

Average Weight (Kg)

Fluid Requirement

0-6 months

 

3.5 – 7

150mls/kg/day

7-12 months

7-11

150mls/kg/day

1 Year

11.5

1.1 l/day

2 Years

13.5

1.3 l/day

3-4 Years

16.5

1.5 l/day

5-6 Years

20

1.7/day

GIRLS

0-6 months

3.7-7

150mls/kg/day

7-12 months

7-11

150mls/kg/day

1 Year

11

1.1 l/day

2 Years

13.5

1.3 l/day

3-4 Years

16

1.5 l/day

5-6 Years

20

1.7/day

Community Child Health and Paediatricians” Edited by Harvey, Miles, Smyth –Hammersmith and St Mary’s Hospitals, London

 

Note: up to a year, the amount of fluid recommended is given in millilitres per kg of weight.  For quick reference, after this age, the total daily fluid required is given based on average weights.

 

Here are 5 top tips about fluids for babies and children

  1. For babies and small children, use cooled boiled water that is still, not sparkling water and check on the label to see that the mineral level is low. Never let anyone else drink directly from a bottle containing water that is being used for a baby. Babies aged 0-3 months should have breast-milk or formula feed only – not plain water or other liquids unless directed by your health professional.

 

  1. Remember that Natural Mineral Water and Spring Water is free from any cleansing agents, such as chlorine. When children get older, the absence of unwanted added chemicals is a clear plus and, due to its pleasant taste, Natural Mineral Water is the ideal way to encourage children to drink this healthiest of drinks. This will also establish good habits for later on in life as it is tooth-kind and calorie free so helpful in the battle against childhood obesity.

 

  1. If you are travelling with a baby, still bottled water is suitable for young children and babies, especially for those babies who are dependent on formula feed. The British Government recommends that all water – whether from the tap or the bottle – should first be boiled and cooled to guarantee it is absolutely safe before being served to a baby of 6 months or younger.  Virtually all British-sourced bottled waters are low or relatively low in minerals* and therefore are fine for young children and for babies, whether or not they are Royal.

 

  1. Generally all water sold for drinking in the UK is safe. Drinking more water – of whatever kind – is likely to benefit children. Water promotes good health; helps ensure correct hydration levels; and because it is kind to teeth can be drunk at any time, just like milk.

 

  1. Keep teeth safe by serving juice and other drinks only occasionally, as special treats, and preferably at a mealtime. Remember that for very young children milk should continue to play a major role in their diet.

ends

NOTES TO EDITORS

*Up to 150 mg/l of sodium is deemed suitable for babies’ feed. Most British waters contain well below this level. Natural Mineral Waters must by law include the mineral content on the label so it is easy to check.

 

For further information contact

Jo Jacobius

British Bottled Water Producers

020 8347 8206 or 07850338998

jo@axiom-uk.com

 

 


Article posted on: 27 April 2015

NOTES TO EDITORS:
For further information please contact us at info@britishbottledwater.org or call us on 020 8347 8206.


The trend towards healthy eating and drinking means that more people are buying bottled water. We're mostly made of water. Water is life-giving and vital.

In the UK we now buy more than 2 billion litres a year. As we consume more water many people naturally want to know that the water they drink is free from unwanted additives; they want to identify the source of the water; and more and more Britons want to avoid unnecessary ‘food miles’.

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